Last updated: July 18. 2013 11:16PM - 59 Views
Amelia Holliday
Staff Reporter



Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

Coming home to a nice, home-cooked meal, a warm, made bed and a generally clean house seems like a thing of the past to most 20-year-olds — or at least most of those that I know.


Many working individuals who I know seem to have the mindset that the life they need and are expected to live is one that makes them kill themselves at their work and be unable to do more at home than heat up a microwave dinner.


I was talking to a friend of mine a few days ago about food and how she’d love to come home to a real meal, but all she has time for is McDonald’s or Stouffer’s. Another friend said he is too tired to even care about what his house looks like.


It seems to me that any kind of domesticated life, whether it be cooking, cleaning, or even decorating, is going by the wayside as the generations move on. But why?


There are many people I know in the older generation who work full-time, but still make an effort to make a nice meal, have a clean and well-decorated house, and not complain about how utterly exhausted they are from the effort.


Maybe it is just a generational thing. I may be one of the few of my peers who is single and who actually does cook, clean, and try to make my home and food visually pleasing; however, I don’t think I should be a minority.


I understand it’s really difficult to juggle everything life throws at you, whether it is work, school, kids, or trying to feed yourself and family. Still, it seems to me that life would be at least a bit more bearable if what you put in your mouth and what you looked at when you sat on the couch after work didn’t make you want to scream from aggravation.


When swinging by your local fast food restaurant has been proven time and again to be more expensive and much less healthy than cooking a simple meal for yourself at home, why would anyone continue to do it?


There are simple solutions here. Planning is key; make a weekly plan of what meals you want to fix and make sure to have everything ready the night before. (Slow-cookers are also a life saver!) Planning chores is also helpful, whether you figure out who of your roommates, family, or even just yourself will do what chore when, it helps to make sure things actually get done so you’re not staring at a monstrous pile of laundry on a Sunday night.


I guess the most important thing to do is to make yourself want to do these things. I’ve been through the same struggle, so I know it’s tough. Once you get into the habit, though, you’ll wonder why you never did it before.



Featured Businesses


Poll



Mortgage Minute